Invitation to Dorset Radical Bookfair 2018.

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Our e-mail address is dorsetbookfair@riseup.net

Dorset’s second Radical Bookfair will take place on Saturday 4th August 2018 at Beaufort Community Centre, Beaufort Rd, Bournemouth BH6 5LB (Nearest railway station is Pokesdown). All rooms have access for disabled people.

Stalls

We invite applications for stalls from individuals, non-hierarchical groups and campaigns, grassroots unions, independent and non-commercial booksellers, artists, publishers and distributors. Priority will be given to those active in class struggle, antifascism, anti-oppression, environmentalism and mutual aid. No political parties please.

Stalls are £15 each in the main hall, we had to raise the price because this venue is significantly more expensive than last year but it has more space. In the unlikely event that we have any spare tables we’ll do our best to share them out on the basis of need. Setup from 9:30, open to public at 11:00.  There is a large car park at the venue.

Meetings

We’d appreciate suggestions for talks, discussions, presentations, workshops and films. Please send us a brief description of what you’d like to do, anything you would need, and a summary for the programme.

Other facilities

We aim to provide vegan food, snacks and drinks throughout the day. There will be a kids’ area – supervised play not crèche, guardians to remain in sight of their charges. Gender-neutral toilets, disabled and baby changing. The fire assembly point is at the front of the building.

Afterparty

Live music and Reggae D.J. at the Riviera Bar in Boscombe until 2 a.m. £5 suggested donation to Bookfair and to cover artists’ expenses. 560 Christchurch Rd Boscombe BH1 4BH – at the top end of the pedestrian bit, it’s about 15 minutes walk from the Beaufort Centre.

We ask participants to endorse our statement of common principles

We want everyone attending this event to feel safe, comfortable and included. We reject hierarchy and coercion, we do not use or tolerate oppressive language: ableism, homophobia, racism, transphobia, sexism, snobbery or otherwise. We do not make excuses for sexual abuse or authoritarian regimes. We respect each other’s boundaries. We may ask people to modify their behaviour or take it elsewhere.

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New IWOC Newsletter: The Imprisoned Worker #1

Industrial Workers of the World Dorset

We are happy to announce the first issue of The Imprisoned Worker. This zine has been put together by the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) Incarcerated Workers’ Organising Committee (IWOC) in Wales, Ireland, Scotland and England. It aims to provide a platform for prisoners, ex-prisoners and fellow workers to educate and organise one another in order to agitate against the prison-industrial-complex.

You can download the Imprisoned Worker in colour here (2mb): Imprisoned Worker #1 Colour

Or download the version for printing (2mb): Imprisoned Worker #1 for Printing

If you would like to order printed copies to distribute, please email iwoc@iww.org.uk

If you have a friend in prison that would like a copy, please email us their address and we would love to post one in.

Entries are welcome for the second edition. Email them to iwoc@iww.org.uk or post them to IWW, PO Box 5251, Yeovil, BA20 9FS

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Early July round-up of workplace news, and antifascist and prisoner resources

1968 in India

Angry Workers of the World

emergency-kjlD--621x414@LiveMintIndia within the global cycle of class struggle 1960 to 1980

We wrote down some thoughts for a discussion meeting with comrades of wildcat (Germany) about the global uprising of 1968, looking at the wider historical background of 1968 in India.

1. ‘Independence’ was not won through a unifying national liberation movement, but handed down to the local bourgeoisie

Despite numerous local uprisings against British colonial rule and Gandhi’s salt marches and calls for non-collaboration, the colonial power was not overthrown by a popular liberation movement like in other former colonies of the global south, but rather handed down by the British administration in 1947. As well as some internal agitation, the Second World War had exhausted the Empire. ‘Independence’ was therefore not characterised by a new nation state unified by the experience of a popular anti-colonial movement, but by a central state that took over the divide-and-rule apparatus established…

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No Pride in the Arms Trade

Bristol Anarchist Federation

The following is a repost of an open letter we have signed, the original is hosted here.

If you would like to add your name to this open letter – please fill in this google form.

We, the undersigned, strongly condemn Bristol Pride’s acceptance of sponsorship money from Airbus for this year’s Pride, and demand that they ditch Airbus as a sponsor.

We want an apology from Bristol Pride, a commitment to never again accept money from those who profit from war crimes, and for them to understand that our community does not exist to be used to pink-wash the arming of oppressive regimes.

Police, dispersing Pride Parade in Istanbul

Solidarity is an action not empty words. For Bristol Pride to claim “we are with” LGBTQ+ activists in Istanbul, who bravely marched despite the ban on Pride, while accepting blood money from a company who supply Turkey’s military…

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My review of “Tory Heaven” or “Thunder on the Right” Marghanita Laski

lipstick socialist

tory heaven 1

Marghanita Laski (24 October 1915 – 6 February 1988) was a writer and novelist who wrote fiction,  biography and plays. Born in Manchester,  she was part of an extended Labour supporting family,  her uncle was Harold Laski, for instance. An atheist,  she was also a member of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

m laski 2

“Tory Heaven” came out in 1948 and,  as David Kynaston points out in the introduction, just like 2018, it was  a worrying time for the middle classes of this country. Whilst 1945 and the great social changes led by Labour Government improved the lives of the working classes,  it was a different case for the middle classes who felt they were now the oppressed,  both psychologically and economically.

Marghanita picks up on this in an insightful and comedic novel.  In “Tory Heaven” it is the Tories who win the General Election in 1945 and proceed to   recreate a…

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